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Anita Ganti
Peppercorn Pioneer
Peppercorn Pioneer
Nov 11, 2021
In All Things Leadership
Reposting from Linkedin: Over a year ago in March 2020, we collectively faced a change to our ways of working that none of us was completely prepared for. My life at the time was organized around work-related travel and face-to-face meetings. Through the pandemic and the past year, I was fortunate enough to make several new connections and take on new board responsibilities. While I found myself blessed enough to be far more productive than I had been before, I wonder what the next normal will look like and with due respect to Robert Zemeckis, if we should be returning “back” to our future? Given the learnings we have all had, can we gather our shared experiences and move forward to the next? Should business leaders expect the office to be exactly as it was before when, with our collective experiences, we have an opportunity to build a digital workplace that also allows us to be engaged and productive? Even as many of us contemplate what work-life after the pandemic will feel like: We know that the design of our future work arrangements needs to be based on what the work requires from us and the scale of our organization. According to Gerdman (2021), corporations may ignore employee inputs into the future of work at their own peril. Some leaders according to an article by Dill (2021) say that you must be physically present to be productive. If you aren't in the business of leasing out workspace and are instead leading a technology company making digitalization possible, this may be a unique time to explore how your technology can be leveraged to help all of us become more engaged and productive no matter where we work from. I’ve learned, like Ogg (2020), that I don’t have to always travel to do business and that my personal productivity increases greatly when I’m not spending a lot of my energy and time traveling. I've found that technology allows me to be more productive than before. Some meeting management tools allow me to collaborate even better than I could before! These are learnings I will continue to use even when we can meet face to face. My meeting management tool of choice is Huddl. Huddl has features that help me collaborate better, become more productive, and have more meaningful meetings (Great Meetings! Meet Less, Do More., n.d.).: For me, an agenda for a meeting is critical to achieving outcomes, and Huddl provides data-driven recommendations. By choosing to make my notes public, all meeting attendees can collaborate and engage in meeting actions, tasks, and next steps or plans. It really feels like a working session. Outcomes are better when everyone leaves a meeting with the same understanding. Huddl allows me to take notes very simply, in real-time. Convert speech to text where needed, and annotate my notes into actions that can be searched and tracked, by event, date, or keyword. Notes and actions are automatically tracked and emailed to attendees with a single click. The feature to search through my past notes helps me organize my actions and plans, and also look back on when decisions were made, or review my own actions as I prepare for follow-ups. Meeting set up is a breeze and directly from my calendar by setting the location as @huddl. Huddl auto-notifies me of my next meeting, and starts my next meeting on time! Employers are exploring a hybrid model that includes a mix of remote and in-person work (Kupp, 2021)., while some employers want their employees “back” in the office once the pandemic ends, others are calling remote work an aberration according to a news report (Dill, 2021). Ultimately, every leader and team will have to determine the best path for their ecosystem as they prepare for the next phase of work. I believe we can work together to build a future with our shared learnings. Leverage technology, towards building a more inclusive, engaged, and collaborative team. I’m curious to learn about the experiences you have gathered during the pandemic. Especially those that you would like to continue to hold on to as we move forward to our next normal. What are some of your learnings and hacks from the past year? References: Gerdman, D. (2021, March 8). COVID Killed the Traditional Workplace. What Should Companies Do Now? Https://Hbswk.Hbs.Edu/. https://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/covid-killed-the-traditional-workplace-what-should-companies-do-now Dill, K. (2021, May 12). WEWORK CEO SAYS LEAST ENGAGED EMPLOYEES ENJOY WORKING FROM HOME. The Wall Street Journal.https://www.wsj.com/articles/wework-ceo-says-workers-who-want-back-into-the-office-are-the-most-engaged-11620837018 Ogg, S. (2020, July 8). My 2020 Productivity Hack. Https://Www.Linkedin.Com.https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/my-2020-productivity-hack-sandy-ogg/ Great meetings! Meet less, do more. (n.d.). Https://Www.Huddl.Ai. Retrieved July 19, 2021, from https://www.huddl.ai Kupp, H. (2021, June 15). The hybrid how-to: How leaders can embrace flexible working models. Https://Futureforum.Com. https://futureforum.com/2021/06/15/the-hybrid-how-to/
‘Back to the future'​ or ‘Forward to the next’? content media
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Anita Ganti
Peppercorn Pioneer
Peppercorn Pioneer
Sep 02, 2021
In Career Pivot
Image: We hiring flat people pose with modern design flat image designed by vectorstock at VectorStock.com While we may not be able to predict the future, I believe we can make ourselves aware of evolving trends, and take charge of adapting ourselves to changes. To quote Leon Megginson quoting Charles Darwin - The species that survives is the one that is able best to adapt and adjust to the changing environment in which it finds itself. There are many reasons for wanting to make a career pivot. One reason could be the disruption to an industry caused by the global pandemic as I covered in an earlier blog. Another reason may be that you are in an industry that is very mature, stagnating, or fast becoming obsolete. Here are a few suggestions and tips on how to execute a career pivot. Understand what drives you and motivates you. Especially at this point in your life and career. We do continuously evolve as people and what motivates you can change. Be willing to let go of your ego and adopt a growth mindset. Ask yourself what new skills you would like to learn. You don’t have to start with a clean slate, inventory the skills you already have, that are adaptable. Elizabeth Uviebinene wrote recently, pivoting is as much about honing repackaging the skills you have to a different role. Meet with others who are in a new area of work, and ask them what they like and don’t like about the role, industry, or culture. Be willing to volunteer, or offer support part-time as you develop a new network and adapt your skills. Dawn Graham in her book switchers, asks you to think like a hiring manager. Understand their situation, challenges, and needs. The empathy you have will allow you to market yourself. Resumes, job boards, and applicant tracking systems were designed with traditional applicants in mind. Career pivoting requires a different approach. Have you successfully made a career pivot? What additional guidance do you have for those seeking to adapt and change?
Pivoting your career content media
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Anita Ganti
Peppercorn Pioneer
Peppercorn Pioneer
Aug 10, 2021
In Career Growth
A personal friend of mine who sources candidates for executive roles at Facebook, let me in on a secret. Her job is a whole lot easier if she is able to find a candidate from Google, who has done the exact same role. As a hiring manager do you only look for experienced hires from a specific set of companies or direct competitors? As an employee have you been able to take your skills to another industry? According to Catalyst, women experienced unprecedented job losses across the world due to the Pandemic. One study of employment and income trends in six countries found that women are 24% more likely to permanently lose their jobs compared to men. Fortunately for many of us, the technology sector saw much less disruption partly because demand for technology products grew during the pandemic and it was possible to perform many of the jobs remotely. Industries that traditionally employ more women than the tech sector such as retail, travel, and hospitality have been in comparison negatively impacted. Technology companies have long recruited from within the industry, even in non-engineering roles such as sales, human resources, marketing, and customer service. Should the tech industry be open to “switchers’ in filling a large number of their open positions? According to a blog by Ross Murray , Greg Lewis with insights from Jenny Ying at LinkedIn, in the United States as of December 2020, women lost a net total of 156,000 jobs. As technology giants seek to improve gender diversity in the workplace, now is an ideal time to attract women from outside the tech sector. One approach is Skills-based hiring. Another approach is to ensure that your job description is written to only include the skills you actually need and remove bias. Employers could consider being open to switchers. For example, could someone who had managed brand or customer service in the travel and tourism industry be considered by recruiters in your company? What changes do you recommend as we seek to undo the damage caused by the pandemic?
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Anita Ganti
Peppercorn Pioneer
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